Friday, 4 February 2011

Coccidiosis In Chickens

This video gives an overview of coccidiosis in chickens and shows how devastating just one bird with coccidiosis can be to an unprotected flock. While coccidiosis can occur at any age the greatest danger of infection is in chicks from four to eight weeks old. It takes around 6 days for the disease to run its course. Often there are no visible symptoms until the third and fourth days. This video does include some archival footage of chicks with coccidiosis and shows some of the symptoms of the disease as it progresses which may be upsetting to some.



20 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent,
Thanks for sharing

Ruth Armitage said...

A very informative video! Thank you so much...

Hopeful said...

thanks... my hen should hatch chick in about 2 1/2 weeks and i am going to watch.

margaret A King said...

thank you for posting this video and all the other links they are all very useful information I will keep a look out for any symptom in my chickens and look forward to your next E-mail. :-)xxx

Lauren Scheuer said...

So good to know -- thank you so much!

Colin daniels said...

Very educational and informative, thankyou Gina.

Across The Creek Farm said...

Keep the feeders full and the litter dry (especially around waterers) and you'll never have a problem with coccidosis. We raise hundred of birds throughtout the year and I've only had one mild outbreak.

ATTRA has a very through publication about the disease @ http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/coccidiosis.html

Anonymous said...

this happened to me last spring. i was ordering chicks each week from 2 hatcherys. i feel that where it came from. it is devastating to you, and the birds. very costly. my vet told me to destroy all of my flock, i did not worked thru it and almost lost all. survivors were stunted. better now! thank you Gina for all you do. Tim Goodin, MORTON,MS

Anonymous said...

thankfully we have never had a problem from this or any disease; we brought in my original 30 chicks from Ideal and they all survived; since then our hens have hatched new chicks with no death; we do keep litter dry and use Stall Dry in the coops to dry up wetness and keep parasites in check; I use the deep litter method

Anonymous said...

I know that the medicated chicken feed is supposed to help prevent this disease, and vaccines are another alternative. But part of the point for me keeping chickens, is to avoid the chemicals and antibiotics. For my new chicks, I immediately put them on Raw Apple Cider Vinegar. This kills e-coli and a host of other bacteria problems. 4 TBS per gallon of water if there is an outbreak, or 1 TB per gallon for maintenance. I put them on 4TB per gal until they are a month old, just to be safe. It has to be raw vinegar with the Veil of the Mother-find it at the health food store. I also use raw garlic in their water for worms. These are much better remedies that antibiotics and medicated foods and vaccines. Plus garlic keeps the poo in the chicken house from being so smelly.

sarahthedoula said...

We started 4 and 1/2 weeks ago with 6 backyard chickens and are now down to 2. I was thinking it was coccidiosis because 3 died on Saturday alone and maybe we were over it? But then I lost another today. I agree with the previous comment, that the whole reason I have backyard chickens is to get away from antibiotics. I'm at a loss. If this is what we had, how do we prevent it in the next flock (assuming we lose them all)

Gina said...

As far as I understand it Coccidiosis is caused by a protozoan, not a bacteria or virus so antibiotics would perhaps not help very much. Farmers used to lose a much higher percentage of their chicks to coccidiosis before the development of the medicated feeds and vaccinations so in terms of a survival rate the medication is probably the most successful option but I don't have any kind of veterinary training so I may be wrong on that.

Anonymous said...

Nice, informative video. My silver laced crested polish cockerel had this when he was a chick. We used medicated water to treat him he lived but when we put all the chicks outside in their new coop raccoons killed him. But we still have 19 other chicks. So its not that big of a loss.

Mrs Bok - The Bok Flock said...

I feed my young ones good feed with coccidiostat in it - once they are at point of lay, switch them to organic feeds. Just be vigilant and dose with sulphur/meds at first sign. It's a horrible Protozoa that lives in soil...and wet litter...awful. Can't do much just hope for the best!

Anonymous said...

Hi, I have a broody bantie that has been sitting on 6 fertile eggs for 21 days. Two eggs are cracked slightly and there was a chirping from inside, now you can hear the chick tapping and trying to get out, but this is 3 hours later. Do I try to help or just leave it? How long before the chick comes out? My bantie has let the egg come out from underneath her as she knows the chick is nearly ready

Gina said...

It can take up to 24 hours for a chick to fully hatch and they often have little rests in between break out attempts. If there is a mother hen there it is probably best left to her - if she doesn't help the chick out there may be a good reason not to.

Emily Gillis said...

Help! I have a hen who is nearly a year old. She has been acting oddly and is just getting worse. She is very lethargic and refuses to eat or drink very much unless I set it in front of her. She stands hunched up or sits on the ground and her droppings are liquidy and rancid. She keeps shaking her head and drifting off to sleep. Her bottom is also swollen. I have bathed her in warm water several times but very little is happening. I am worried she will die.

Gina said...

Has she laid an egg recently - could it be she is egg bound?

Rabi'u Muhammad said...

Hi Gina, I very happy by subscribing to your newsletter.
I run my business by ordering 1000 cockerels feeding them up to two weeks, and selling them.
At last time I sold my chicks, the buyer separated 19 from them and said these were pullets, I could live them if I liked to get eggs in future.
My question here is that, how can pullets be understood from the cockerels in an early age? THANKS from Rabiu

Gina said...

For most of us it isn't really possible to know unless you get sex-linked breeds. Even professionals are only accurate to about 95%.